Geomancy ... real and imaginary

 
-The magic of belief
  • magical processes need support from physical reality
  • Understanding imagination
  • everything is imaginary: we 'realise' it, make it real
  • Dancing divinely
  • examples: dowsing-geomancy and other intuitive skills
  • The memory of place
  • places have memory, created by and echoed in people



Geomancy is a magical technology - which means that at some point we need to understand the magic behind the technology! In a magical process, we create something from nothing: or, more accurately, we create something by understanding what 'nothing' actually is. We create hope from despair, by understanding despair; we create health from sickness, by understanding that sickness, and accepting it for what it is. Every change we might want - such as the tea-break you probably now need! - starts off as something imaginary: the magic is that we make that change real - 'real-ise' it - from nothing, from 'no-thing'. But that magical process always needs some kind of anchor and support from physical reality: we can all imagine winning the lottery, but we probably won't ever win unless we actually buy a ticket... You can eat your words, a magician friend told me, but they're not exactly satisfying as food!

But we still always need that spark of intuition, to fire off the imagination to start the magic rolling. So the various forms of divination become important tools in geomancy. One of these tools is dowsing, of which the best-known form is water-divining: it's a way of using the body to see and feel, in direct experience, the underlying structure of the land or other context.

And decades ago dowsers and other diviners demonstrated that places have their own kind of memory, recording events of various kinds within their structures. This 'memory' has physical aspects - identifiable sounds have been retrieved from ancient stones, for example - but it can spring some nasty surprises on geomancers and other people if we're not aware of its existence!