The forgotten victims

"The 'M' word' is important", says Kate Gilmore. "Violence against women will cease, not when 'someone' stops being violent, or when people stop being violent, but when men stop being violent."[1] Only men. Apparently violence against women by women isn't violence at all - which might be news to Mrs Morris, who was fortunate indeed to survive her encounter with Mrs Garland...

In the rush to blame men for all violence, women - and children - abused by other women have become the forgotten victims. Their pain is no less simply because it was done by someone of a slightly different body shape: abuse is abuse is abuse, violence is violence is violence, whatever form it - or the perpetrator - may take.

The forgotten victims

- is majority of female violence focused on same gender?

- dangers of dismissing inter-female violence as 'just bitching': psychological/emotional/spiritual damage should not be underestimated

- active silencing of women abused by other women

- 'women's magazines' - Diana Spencer, etc.

- 'horse's head' example; school-age bullying, exclusion; Petaluma case (mother sues school/school counsellor for failing to protect daughter against sexual teasing; feminist lawyers take up case to 'get schools to change boys behaviour before they become abusive men'; but girl concerned says the most serious abuse by far came from other girls, not boys)

- problems of violence in lesbian relationships - more examples (Cath Murray, etc)

- indirect assault - e.g. the old 'it's OK to hit a man' problem reworked as another way to 'get at' another woman

[1] Interview with Kate Gilmore in Don Parham's SBS [Australia] documentary "Deadly Hurt", May 1994.